Penis Enlargement

Yes, it can, but surgery is always associated with risks, including anesthesia, wound healing deficits, pain from scars, worst case even a deformed penis or permanent erectile problems. It’s effective without a doubt, but the last resort in our opinion. For men with a real micropenis (smaller than 2.75 inch) it’s often the only solution and covered by health insurance, but only about 0.5% of all men worldwide suffer from this condition. If you are just a bit below average, the risk versus reward calculation is negative for surgical penis enlargement. Especially one problem that arises from cutting the ligaments, the erection pointing slightly downwards instead of straight forward, can become a real problem according to professor Kevan Wylie from the NHS, he said “It can make sex quite uncomfortable. You’ve got to do a lot more manoeuvring with your partner. The advantage of a 2cm (0,8 inch) gain in flaccid length is far outweighed by the loss of angle of erection.”
When you do Kegel exercises, you can target, train and strengthen your pelvic muscles. “Strengthening your pelvic muscles improves sexual performance, reverses or prevents erectile dysfunction, promotes urinary health (incontinence and overactive bladder), and benefits prostate health by providing increased blood flow,” says Rybchin. “Once you achieve initial pelvic muscle strength, you then add the resistance training — a resistance ring and weights. As you get stronger, you then add the additional weight.”

This is not some fanciful idea, or is it theoretical hogwash. Evidence from one study of 367 military personnel, all men, and no one older than 40, found those who felt most satisfied in terms of male genital self-image had lower levels of sexual anxiety and better sexual functioning. And what about the self-doubting ones, those who disliked the appearance of their member? The researchers found the opposite to be true in some (though not all) cases. Dissatisfaction led to anxiety, which led to sexual difficulties — a vicious cycle.

In July 2017, the 55-year-old decorator, from London, became one of a growing number of British men to have a surgical penis enlargement. Talk of enhancement was once the preserve of promotional spam mail for bizarre-looking pills and pumps; now, it is serious clinical business. British clinics, which have taken consultancy rooms in Harley Street and in UK cities including Manchester, Sheffield, Birmingham and Leeds, report record numbers of patients calling on their services. One practice, the London Centre for Aesthetic Surgery, has gone from performing a handful of penis procedures annually when it opened in 1990 to more than 250 in 2017. Between 2013 and 2017, members of the International Society of Aesthetic Plastic Surgery carried out 45,604 penis enhancements worldwide. Previous numbers are unknown; the procedure was considered such a minority concern that it wasn’t included in surveys. This increase in demand seemingly caters to a growing anxiety about penis size, but it is by no means a risk-free procedure. For Alistair, dreams of a larger penis were overtaken by infections, lumps and an erection that no longer rises above a 45-degree angle. And he is not alone. In recent years, the General Medical Council has recorded stories of “wonky penises” and erectile dysfunction following surgery. In Stockholm, last summer, a 30-year-old man died after suffering a cardiac arrest following an operation to enlarge his penis.
This evaluation is something all clinics I speak to insist on. It involves a patient meeting with a surgeon or psychologist to have their general mental wellbeing assessed. If there is any hint of underlying concerns, problems or mental health issues, the operation does not go ahead. But, given that such a refusal would mean clinics losing £5,000 a pop, one does wonder how rigorous these assessments are. Is the entire industry just profiting off insecurity bordering on dysmorphia?

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